Citizen

A Style Story

Text by

Becky Akinyode

Photography by

Andy Jackson

Issue

002

A Style Story

New York based, stylist, and cool girl, Becky Akinyode is the personification of self-expression, of “come-with-my-whole-self”. Interpreting a selection of pieces from Burberry, she expresses in clothing and words her own unique fashion story.

Interview by

Becky Akinyode

Photography by

Andy Jackson

Issue

002

New York based, stylist, and cool girl, Becky Akinyode is the personification of self-expression, of “come-with-my-whole-self”. Interpreting a selection of pieces from Burberry, she expresses in clothing and words her own unique fashion story.

Fashion allows you to be whoever you want to be. Fashion is expressive and it changes how I feel about myself.

“A lot of times you are your biggest critic, and you’re the reason why you might be getting held up because of fear.”

I think I’ve always been interested in clothes. Originally, as a young girl, I realized the way I dressed could act as a sort of armor. I was born in America but I lived in Nigeria for two years, from the age of five to seven and when I came back to America, I had an accent, I was dark-skinned, I was differ- ent, so I got teased a lot. Somewhere around middle school, I realized that because of how I dressed, people didn’t neces- sarily say I was cool, but they would compliment me. So, I started caring about clothes.

In high school, I started reading magazines and watch- ing The Style Network, and going vintage shopping with my sisters. And the intention behind me dressing a certain type of way morphed from being a kind of protection to being a desire for me to exist in my own world, to let clothes speak for me.

Some people probably think I dress weird, but I think for me, I like to look good, and I’m the one who determines what looks good. My style is very material. It’s eclectic and eccen- tric, but also that’s how I think people describe it. I like to “dress up”, and I see that in quotations because to me, it’s not really dressing up. To me, it’s just like wearing what I want to wear.

I knew I always wanted to work in fashion, though it took me a while to get here. From an early age, my bedroom walls were covered with printouts from Teen Vogue, Vogue, Italian Vogue, and sometimes whatever magazine caught my eye. So I’m grateful that I’m able to work with clothes. I always knew I wanted to do this, but there was a point where I was pretty afraid to admit to myself that I wanted to be a stylist or I wanted to be an editor.

I went to Georgetown and studied international business, graduated from Georgetown, and moved to LA. I worked in e-commerce because I was like, the next wave of fashion is e-commerce. But that didn’t work out in the sense that I realized I wanted to be more hands-on with clothes. I wanted to be a stylist. As soon as you admit to yourself that you’re going to work towards achieving your dreams, the easier it becomes to achieve them, because a lot of times you are your biggest critic, and you’re the reason why you might be getting held up because of fear. So I had to get over that fear and admit that this is what I want to do and this is what I’m good at—and I am good at it.

“This is what I’m good at—and I am good at it.”

Prev

Genetic Imagination

Next

Only One, Tina Bell